Purpose

A randomized, clinical trial will be performed to assess changes in body weight and fat mass with daily potato consumption versus a calorie-matched snack of almonds.

Condition

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 18 Years and 50 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
Yes

Inclusion Criteria

  • 18- 50 years old
  • Body mass index (BMI) 20- 35
  • No dietary restrictions or allergies
  • Weight stable
  • Access to camera through smartphone, computer or tablet

Exclusion Criteria

  • Pregnancy or anticipating pregnancy or lactation
  • Nut or food allergy
  • Diagnosed diabetes (Type 1 or 2)
  • History of weight control surgery (bariatric or liposuction)
  • Consumes >1 serving of potatoes daily before enrollment
  • Weight loss or gain >5% within past 6 months
  • Medical conditions or medications that would prevent the ability to comply with treatment assignment and/or affect energy balance
  • Dependence on others for food procurement or preparation

Study Design

Phase
N/A
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose
Basic Science
Masking
Single (Outcomes Assessor)

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Experimental
White potato (French fries)
Participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of French fries each day for 30 days.
  • Other: White potato (french fries)
    If randomized to this group, participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of French fries (~300 kcal) each day for 30 days as a part of their usual dietary intake. French fries will be portioned and provided to participants.
  • Other: White potato (French fries), +seasoning
    If randomized to this group, participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of French fries (~300 kcal) with added potential glycemia modifying seasoning mix each day for 30 days as a part of their usual dietary intake. French fries and seasoning will be portioned and provided to participants.
Experimental
White potato (French fries), +seasoning
Participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of French fries with added seasoning each day for 30 days.
  • Other: White potato (French fries), +seasoning
    If randomized to this group, participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of French fries (~300 kcal) with added potential glycemia modifying seasoning mix each day for 30 days as a part of their usual dietary intake. French fries and seasoning will be portioned and provided to participants.
Active Comparator
Almond
Participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of almonds (calorie-matched to other arms) day for 30 days.
  • Other: Almond
    If randomized to this group, participants will be asked to consume 1 serving of almonds that is calorically-matched to the French fries (~300 kcal) serving in the other arms each day for 30 days as a part of their usual dietary intake. Almonds will be portioned and provided to participants.

Recruiting Locations

University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama 35294
Contact:
Daniel Smith, PhD

More Details

NCT ID
NCT03518515
Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Study Contact

Rebecca Hanson, MS, RD
205-975-4113
reba0315@uab.edu

Detailed Description

This is a 30-day randomized, controlled trial with 3 arms: 1) non-potato food (almonds), 2) standard white potato French fry, 3) standard white potato French fry with potential glycemia-modulating spice/seasoning mix added.

Free-living study participants will be assigned to consume one of the 3 foods (calorie matched) each day for a 30-day period. Body composition (via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry; DXA), and blood chemistry will be assayed at baseline and study completion, along with a sub-sample of subjects participating in a meal-based tolerance tests at study completion.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.